The Year On The Coin

May 21, 2012

The date on the coin I’m holding is 1981.

So. .  . what was I doing in 1981?

Here’s the game: look at the date on a coin and ask yourself what you were doing that year. Something, or even a list of things, will reach out from your memory. And sometimes you have an idea you were doing something but you aren’t entirely sure it was exactly during the year on the coin. This too may lead you into another adventure.

Try it. Look at the date on a coin and ask yourself what you were doing that year. Your memory is like a diary and random coin dates from a pocket full of change will trigger much more that you might expect. (Personally, I’ve been able to remember things in response to coin dates back to as early as age three. How about you?)

Then there’s the unknown: those dates prior to your time on this earth. What might you have been doing then? Just let the imagination wonder a little and don’t worry as it is all meant to be fun. An alternative might be to ask yourself about sports and politics during those prior years.

One thing I do know is memories generally fascinate us: we try to remember things all the time.

My clients often bring memories to be painted: people and places that mean so much to them. Maybe a date on a coin will trigger something like this for you.

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Jim Pescott is an international contemporary artist who lives and creates in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. To contact Jim directly about his paintings, or about a project you think about, please phone 403-870-0791 or email Jim at paintwithdots@shaw.ca Jim Facebook page is http://facebook.Jimpescottpaintingsindots Visit his website at http://www.jimpescott.com  

Coffee Talk

April 3, 2012

Over coffee, at the kitchen table, Morse shared, “If someone can draw a rock they can draw anything.”

We weren’t talking about rocks and we weren’t talking about drawing but it didn’t seem to matter to Morse. He just thought it should be said.

Many years later, as we sat with our coffee, there were some rocks on the kitchen table and Morse was drawing them. I watched. Moments like this say so much about how lives happen. How many rocks in the garden do we see but decline the opportunity to spend time with them.

Morse never said why he waited so long but it was very clear drawing rocks had been on his mind for some time. The wonderful part is Morse finally gathered some rocks to nourish the artist he held within.

Do you know stories like this?

 

 

Love Affair

March 27, 2012

 “You have a love affair with aspens.”

I heard the words and immediately felt so guilty. I’d not ever thought about aspens as an object of love but I knew it was true.

Right now, in my studio, I’m painting a group of seven canvases that include a total of seventy-five aspen trees around the theme “In A Yellow Wood”. Proof enough. Who would do this if they didn’t love aspens?

Aspens are so interesting. Each aspen is an individual: it looks nothing like its neighbour aspen as a douglas fir would. Every aspen is its own shape and this, together with the scars it displays, relates the individual life it lives. How like people this seems.  Perhaps each aspen I paint is a portrait.

What is the tree that you love?

The aspens in this painting are on a hillside that slopes toward an escarpment. They endure a nearby roadway, certainly gravity and people who brush against them. Of course the raw elements of various weather systems throughout the year are a significant endurance as well. This group of aspens seems much like a family as they reach to each other and touch.

Reading Italian

May 13, 2011

I’ve been in Ferrara, Italy, for over a week (also managed a day in Florence). The primary reason for being here has been to follow my paintings to the successful “Here Now” exhibition that ends today. Then again, any reason to be in Italy is a good reason.

Otherwise, I’ve been walking the city streets: buildings, people and art and everywhere I see something to paint. I’ve also been absorbing the Italian language but as I’m mostly a visual person, a painter, the written word holds better with me (at least for now). Today I met up with some sculpture that allowed me to read over a shoulder. Much fun. Ciao!